This Algae-Based Sequin Dress is 100% Biodegradable

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Instead of plastic or metal, these sequins are made of algae bioplastic and sewn onto a base fabric made from biodegradable plant fibers.

By Arielle Tiangco for The Optimist Daily: Making Solutions the News

This Algae-Based Sequin Dress is 100 Percent Biodegradable

Eco-conscious fashionistas rejoice! Thanks to designers Charlotte McCurdy and Philip Lim, you can rock sequins without worrying about their negative effects on the environment.

Sequins are small, flat, light-catching beads that have long been adorned by the glitzy and the glamorous, but always at the cost of the environment. Most sequins are made of tiny bits of shiny or translucent plastic and are contributors to the microplastics we find floating in our oceans. To combat this issue, McCurdy and Lim have designed a couture sequin dress that is 100 percent biodegradable.

Instead of plastic or metal, these sequins are made of algae bioplastic and sewn onto a base fabric made from biodegradable plant fibers. The shimmery green dress is inspired by shades found in nature and is free from all synthetic plastics and dyes. To top it all off, the entire creation is carbon neutral.

This isn’t Charlotte McCurdy’s first design that uses fashion to highlight global issues like climate change. She is also known for her water-resistant raincoat that is constructed out of a material developed from algae that naturally absorbs and captures carbon from the atmosphere.

Philip Lim also has a shining track record within the fashion industry, boasting titles like the Fashion Group International’s Women’s Designer “Rising Star” Award, among others. Together, the pair have executed this consciously couture dress as a part of the One X One Project, a design initiative organized by Slow Factory Foundation that matches scientists with designers to create innovative ways to integrate equitable design and regenerative technologies into the fashion industry.

To find out what other eco-consciously cool creations are in the works, check out the One X One Project website.

By Arielle Tiangco for The Optimist Daily: Making Solutions the News

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