San Francisco Homeless Camp Costs $60,000 Per Tent, Per Year

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The city is paying “about twice the median cost of a 1-bedroom apartment for each tent”, the report says, funded by a 2018 business tax known as Proposition C.

By Tyler Durden for ZeroHedge News
© 2021 ZeroHedge News – All Rights Reserved

San Francisco Homeless Camp Costs $60,000 Per Tent, Per Year

Today in “liberals making wonderful capital allocation decisions with your tax dollar news”…

It turns out “solving” the homelessness problem that has (along with sky high taxes) been plaguing San Francisco, driving residents out of the city (and state), is a costly endeavor.

In fact, a homeless encampment run by San Francisco costs the city $60,000 per year, per tent, the NY Post reported this week.

The city has six “safe sleeping villages,” which offer up tents and three meals a day to homeless people. They also provide security and washrooms.

Mayor London Breed reaffirmed her commitment to find care for the homeless (and burn through tons of taxpayer cash), stating last week: “For those exhibiting harmful behavior, whether to themselves or to others, or those refusing assistance, we will use every tool we have to get them into treatment and services, to get them indoors. We won’t accept people just staying on the streets, when we have a place for them to go.”

The news comes as San Francisco mulls renewing the program, which could cost about $57,000 per tent. There are currently about 260 tents, the report notes.

The city is paying “about twice the median cost of a one-bedroom apartment for each tent”, the report says. And the encampment is being funded by a 2018 business tax known as Proposition C.

The city is expecting to spend more than $1 billion over the next two years on homelessness. Mayor Breed calls it a “historic investment,” according to the SF Chronicle.

Supervisor Hillary Ronen said at a budget meeting: “It is a big deal to have showers and bathrooms, and I don’t dispute that. But the cost just doesn’t make any sense.”

Supervisor Matt Haney, chair of the board’s Budget and Finance committee, argued for the idea: “In the past, the city would spend a lot of money without a plan. Now we actually have a plan. Prop. C is the plan. Now we have to make it work and make it real, we have to track outcomes and follow the data and be transparent about successes and challenges.”

Good luck with that.

By Tyler Durden for ZeroHedge News
© 2021 ZeroHedge News – All Rights Reserved

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