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Drapers San is right on the sea in San San area, 4 miles form Port Antonio. Drapers San is a Bed and Breakfast which offers two cottage-style houses nearby the sea, surrounded by a colourful and flowery garden where chairs and benches offer the perfect relax.

The community of Drapers is approximately 5 km from Port Antonio, at the start of San San, an area which boasts the most beautiful beaches of Jamaica. Maria Carla, the owner, is an Italian who has lived on the island for many years. Besides taking care of her bed and breakfast, with her daughter Francesca, she is very involved with human rights issues and has established a non-profit organization called Stand Up For Jamaica which promotes several humanitarian projects.

For all those interested, the Association has a web site and is on Facebook. Maria Carla is passionate about reggae music and if her guests share this interest, she will galdly a van to take them to some of the most beautiful concerts.

Draper San offers a family atmosphere and there is always someone willing to provide suggestions and advice, information regarding the nearby areas and the local culture. Maria Carla and Francesca know Jamaica very well and are always ready and willing to share their knowledge with their guests. This is the best way to learn about such a diverse and fascinating country which is worthy of one’s curiosity.

Port Antonio is a small town which sits at the intersection of two twin bays where the twin islands are located. The town is fun and lively at all hours, with the exception of Sunday morning. The atmosphere is bustling both in the shops that sell just about everything and outdoors where the Jerk chicken is always being cooked in the barrels and the many carts sell fruit and sugar cane.

In the evening, the streets come to life with a great deal of dancing; again the atmosphere is lively and the Jamaicans stand out for the very bright and colourful style of clothing they love to wear because when the Jamaicans decide to go out and have fun, they love to display their elegance.

The Roof Club, the Road Block Dance and the Crystal are the most well known places. And should you stay there until very late, the taxi service, located in the market square, never sleeps. Our Bed & Breakfast offers 7 rooms which can accommodate up to 13 people at the most.

The rooms are colourful and are furnished in the Jamaican style. The guest house offers either a view of the sea or the garden. There are a variety of options from a triple room, a cottage and the Rasta Cottage all with private bath. We also have three double rooms and a single, each with shared baths.

The cost of each rooms includes a hearty breakfast with coffee, tea, bread and home-made jam, fruit, eggs or cake and the legendary banana and vanilla fritters. For anyone who wants to eat in, we have an excellent cook who prepares tasty meals but you must reserve by 2 PM because we do not cook any frozen food.

If you want to learn some Jamaican recipes, you are welcome to come into the kitchen and observe. Our Guest House also has an equipped kitchen where guests can cook their own meals. The rooms are cleaned everyday and linen is provided. We do not, however, supply beach towels.

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Lime Tree Farm is an environmentally friendly coffee farm set in 10 acres at the heart of Jamaica’s Blue Mountains, the highest mountain range in the the Caribbean rising up to 7,402 ft.

As well as growing coffee, Lime Tree Farm provides you with the wonderful opportunity to see the real beauty of Jamaica and to meet her people by staying in one of four Blue Mountain eco-cottages. The holiday accommodation is  run like a private house, except that as a guest you need do nothing other than relax, walk, eat and sleep in the most beautiful surroundings in total silence.

Our spacious cottages offer stunning unspoiled panoramic views down into Cedar and Yallus Valley and out across the Blue Mountains towards the eastern tip of Jamaica – a view that hasn’t changed in thousands of years.

For those looking for activities in the Blue Mountains, enjoy fresh air and rambling there are wonderful local mountain trails to be followed, enjoying Jamaica’s most prized natural treasures – its 3000 flowering species, 100’s of orchids and nearly 600 types of ferns. Not forgetting the myriad species of birds, 30 species endemic to Jamaica. For the hardy, a guided day hike to the summit of Blue Mountain Peak allows you to gaze across to Cuba just 90 miles away. There are few things that compare to hiking in the Blue Mountains of Jamaica.

We offer tours of Lime Tree coffee farm. Watch the cherry red coffee beans being picked (or join in) and follow the process through to coffee roasting. Everything is done by hand – picking, pulping, drying, selecting and roasting. Then the best part, we get to drink the freshly roasted coffee.

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Immerse yourself if the heritage of the island as your expert guide shares the story of this colonial ruin restored to its former majesty in the 1960’s. Learn about the lifestyle of the European bourgeoisie in the isles of the Caribbean in the Eighteenth Century.

The greatest of Jamaican great houses, the Rose Hall Great House has a story with all the elements of an engaging novel. Built in 1770 by John Palmer and his wife, it eventually became the residence of their grandnephew, John Rose Palmer. In 1820, Palmer married Annee, a beautiful but feisty English girl. The tale of the Annee Palmer, the famed White Witch of Rose Hall is sure to delight. Beautiful tropical gardens and personalities will colour your experience fun along the way!

Experience the Rose Hall Plantation’s dramatic past as you venture into the world of the White Witch as she roams this Eighteenth Century sugar plantation seeking the love and fortune that first lured her here.

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Located just outside Montego Bay, Rastafari Indigenous Village is a living cultural center that offers you an opportunity to experience the Rastafari way of life. Whether you choose a half or full-day tour, you’ll have the unique opportunity to connect with Rastafarians, and learn more about their culture and values.

You’ll be introduced to drum makers who create traditional drums by hand, using techniques that have been passed down through generations. You can tour an organic vegetable and herb garden and learn more about why the Rastafari choose to follow a vegan diet, and what are its benefits. You can then have a meal with the Rastafari, and taste for yourself.

A small store offers traditional handicrafts and jewelry. The tour concludes with a performance of traditional drumming and singing in the center of the village.

Irits is our monthly acoustic gathering curated with the aim of creating balance by harmonizing music, food, healing, and art, with culture, preserving living aspects of Jamaican heritage, blending live music, an ital vegan cuisine and local artists.

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With the gushing waters of the Tangle River, which flows into the Martha Brae, creating the spine of the five-acre property, this cultural enclave captures the history of Jamaica and gives one the opportunity to live and breathe its essence.

As you enter the caves on the banks of the river, for example, you can see the writings and carvings of the Taino people who once inhabited it; or hike a few miles and bravely climb the steep cliffs to a cave which sustained Cudjoe and his men in their effort to evade the British.

Beyond the caves lies the ruins of the Dromilly Great House, and the site where Cudjoe and his men ambushed British troops around 1795. Bunkers Hill is a cultural experience and river tour located in Trelawny which features a botanical garden, cascading waterfalls and a huge cave, believed to be used as a hideout by chief of the Maroons Cudjoe, and his followers in the 18th century.

Everything about the Bunkers Hill Cultural Xperience is authentically Jamaican.

The drinks and meals are served in painted enamel cups and plates along with the utensils Jamaicans used in the 19th to mid-20th centuries; or, on banana leaves, carefully cleaned calabash shells, as was the practice of the Maroons. These traditions are also kept alive by their descendants in some rural Jamaican communities.

The operation provides an employment and production boon in the community, giving its mainly farming constituents an additional source of income. It already employs 10 people part-time; and, with its upcoming launch and expansion, there will be a need for additional cooks, tour guides, lifeguards, and others.

We were established in 2014 by Clover and O’Brian Gordon, who fell in love with the site in Trelawny and have been slowly building the business ever since.

Rasta vs. Babylon
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